Anaphora in a two-sentence pair

The words in blue are examples of anaphora:

Sentence fragments have long been a form that most teachers try to eradicate from student writing. However well intentioned this may be, does it help students become better writers of nonfiction?

The words this and it both refer to trying to eradicate sentence fragments from student writing.

When writers use different words or expressions to “rename” or refer back to something that appeared earlier in the text, they are using anaphora.

To understand what a word like “this” or “it” means, you have to know which word or words, or which idea, “this” or “it” has replaced.

Here’s what the two sentences above might sound like without “this” and “it”:

Sentence fragments have long been a form that most teachers try to eradicate from student writing. However well intentioned trying to eradicate sentence fragments from student writing may be, does trying to eradicate sentence fragments from student writing help students become better writers of nonfiction?

As a general rule, you can’t find out what anaphora mean by looking them up in the dictionary.

The meaning of anaphora is inside the text you are reading, not the dictionary.

FULL PASSAGE HERE

AND SEE:
William J. Kerrigan on Step 6

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s