Which paragraph is easier to read and why?

One of the paragraphs in this post appears in World History: Patterns of Interaction, Grades 9-12 (Michigan). New York: McDougal Littell, 2008. (Print.) (378.)

PARAGRAPH 1:
German kings after Frederick, including his grandson Frederick II, continued their attempts to revive Charlemagne’s empire and his alliance with the Church. This policy led to wars with Italian cities and to further clashes with the Pope. Conflicts were one reason why the feudal states of Germany did not unify during the Middle Ages. Another reason was that the system of German princes electing the king weakened royal authority. German rulers controlled fewer royal lands to use as a base of power than French and English kings of the same period, who, as you will learn in Chapter 14, were establishing strong central authority.

PARAGRAPH 2
German kings after Frederick, including Frederick’s grandson Frederick II, were no more successful than Frederick had been. Like Frederick, they failed to revive Charlemagne’s empire and his alliance with the Pope. They incited fruitless wars with Italian cities and further clashes with the Pope, and the constant conflict undermined their ability to unify Germany’s feudal states under one king. They were further weakened by Germany’s political system, which allowed German princes to elect the king. Another obstacle: German kings held relatively few royal lands compared to the French and English kings, who controlled large territories. As you will learn in Chapter 14, French and English kings during this period were establishing strong central authority. Meanwhile the German kings succeeded neither in reviving the Empire nor in unifying the country.

PARAGRAPH 3
The German kings after Frederick, including his grandson Frederick II, continued Frederick’s efforts to revive Charlemagne’s empire and his alliance with the Church, but they did not succeed. Like Frederick, they incited fruitless wars with Italian cities and further clashes with the Pope, and the constant conflict undermined their ability to unify Germany’s feudal states under one king. The kings were further weakened by the German political system, which allowed German princes to elect the king, and by their relative lack of royal lands compared to the large territories controlled by French and English kings–who, as you will learn in Chapter 14, were establishing strong central authority in their own countries during this period. Frederick’s successors succeeded neither in reviving the empire nor in unifying their country.

ANSWER

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