Present-tense summary of “The Lost Horse”

A horse belonging to a man in northern China runs away, and when everyone consoles the man his father says, “What makes you so sure this isn’t a blessing?” Months later the horse returns accompanied by a “splendid nomad stallion,” and when people congratulate the man his father says, “What makes you so sure this isn’t a disaster?” Later, when the man breaks his hip falling off the horse, and people again try to console him, the father says, “What makes you so sure this isn’t a blessing?” A year later nomads attack and slaughter nearly all of the able-bodied man who must fight them. Because the son is lame, he and his father survive “to take care of each other.”

Blessings turn to disaster, and disaster to blessing: the changes have no end, and the mystery cannot be fathomed.

Past-tense summary of “The Lost Horse”

AND SEE:
The “literary present” in English papers

Change past tense to present

INSTRUCTIONS: Rewrite this summary of “The Lost Horse” in the present tense.

A horse belonging to a man in northern China ran away, and when everyone consoled the man his father said, “What makes you so sure this isn’t a blessing?” Months later the horse returned accompanied by a “splendid nomad stallion,” and when people congratulated the man his father said, “What makes you so sure this isn’t a disaster?” Later, when the man broke his hip falling off the horse, and people again tried to console him, the father said, “What makes you so sure this isn’t a blessing?” A year later nomads attacked and slaughtered nearly all of the able-bodied man who had to fight them. Because the son was lame, he and his father survived “to take care of each other.”

“Blessings turned to disaster, and disaster to blessing: the changes had no end, and the mystery could not be fathomed.”

Tales of Wonder from Many Lands: A Reader for Composition. 4th ed. Edited by Howard Canaan and Joel N. Feimer. Deer Park, NY: Linus Publications, 2009. 72. Print.

Present-tense summary of “The Lost Horse”

AND SEE:
The “literary present” in English papers