F.G.’s opening ‘grabber’

Fairy tales mostly happen in “once upon a time” land, which wouldn’t be on a map.

I love this!

Here’s a copy edit for tone:

Fairy tales happen in “once upon a time” land, which does not appear on a map.

or:

Fairy tales happen in “once upon a time” land, which does not appear on any map.

Not sure whether I prefer “a” or “any.”

A fantastic thesis statement from JG

Assignment: The characters in fables, folktales, and/or fairy tales are “true to life.” Agree or disagree. (SIMPLE ARGUMENT)

Although characters in folktales and fairytales have familiar human traits and settings, they are not true to life in that the characters and settings are fanciful inventions designed by the author to entertain us, something that an ordinary human character or setting cannot do.

A possible X-1-2-3 set:

X Although characters in folktales and fairytales have familiar human traits and settings, they are not true to life in that the characters and settings are fanciful inventions designed by the author to entertain us, something that an ordinary human character or setting cannot do.
1 Characters in folktales and fairytales have familiar human traits and settings.
2 The characters are not true to life in that the characters and settings are fanciful inventions.
3  The characters are designed by the author to entertain us, something that an ordinary human character or setting cannot do.

A terrific 2-sentence pair by S.Y.

In this 2-sentence pair by S.Y., I especially like the very short sentence coming after the longer one:

Firstly, in “Chanticleer and Renard the Fox or The Trickster Tricked,” the conflict is between a wise character, Chanticleer, and a clever character, Renard. In this fable the wise character prevails.

Excellent introduction by J.G.

In just three sentences, J.G. makes an important and arresting observation about the nature of fables and their characters:

Aesop’s fables, which date back to the 5th Century BC, share similar themes. Because their themes are expressed through characters, they share similar characters as well. In fact, the characters in fables are so similar it would be impossible to tell them apart without reading the stories themselves. There are three primary types of characters in fables: wise, foolish, and clever.